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Clear Creek County Advocates

ESCAPE

How to talk to someone who is feeling suicidal

If you suspect that a family member or friend may be considering suicide, talk to them about your concerns. You can begin the conversation by asking questions in a non-judgmental and non-confrontational way.


Talk openly and don’t be afraid to ask direct questions, such as 

“Are you thinking about suicide?”


During the conversation, make sure you:

*stay calm and speak in a reassuring tone

*acknowledge that their feelings are legitimate

*offer support and encouragement

*tell them that help is available and that they can feel better with treatment


Make sure not to minimize their problems or attempts at shaming them into changing their mind. Listening and showing your support is the best way to help them. You can also encourage them to seek help from a professional.


Offer to help them find a healthcare provider, make a phone call, or go with them to their first appointment.


It can be frightening when someone you care about shows suicidal signs. But it’s critical to take action if you’re in a position to help. Starting a conversation to try to help save a life is a risk worth taking.

If you’re concerned and don’t know what to do, you can get help from a crisis or suicide prevention hotline.


If you live in the United States, try the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK (800-273-8255). They have trained counselors available 24/7. Stop a Suicide Today is another helpful resource.